plantiff justice

Justice — defendants suffer financial losses, plaintiffs lose much more

Many plaintiffs do not have the resources that defendants have. Plaintiffs are the ones that suffered a loss in the accident. Defendants often do not lose anything in the accident. Unfortunately, even after a settlement is reached, many plaintiffs have still lost more than the defendants lost.

Defendants typically only suffer financial losses. The defendant pays the plaintiff as little as possible and moves on. On the other hand, plaintiffs typically lose much more. Not only do they suffer financial loss because of the medical bills and other injury-related expenses, they also often lose some of their physical capabilities, at least temporarily. Plaintiffs may suffer injuries such as broken bones, broken ribs, head injuries, amputation, and even paralysis. Money often cannot repair all the losses the plaintiff in a personal injury lawsuit suffers.

Further, the losses the personal injury plaintiff suffers often make it more difficult for the plaintiff to be reimbursed for those losses. If the defendant does significant damage to the personal injury plaintiff, the plaintiff will have more expenses from the injury and need money sooner. This encourages plaintiffs to accept a lower settlement in order to get the money faster. Thus, the defendant could actually be better off if he does more damage to the plaintiff.

Pegasus Legal Funding remedies this problem. Pegasus Legal Funding provides funds to plaintiffs, so they can afford to pay their expenses without having to obtain a rushed settlement. Although money cannot fix all the problems caused by a personal injury, Pegasus Legal Funding can at least ensure the plaintiff has the ability to seek an appropriate settlement.

About the author:

Alexander Khanas is a Principal and co-founder of Pegasus Legal Funding, LLC. Alex possesses a background of criminal justice and financial expertise to Pegasus, and oversees the daily operations of the organization.

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